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20121101
20121130
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WETA 5
KRCB (PBS) 3
KQED (PBS) 2
WMPT (PBS) 2
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English 12
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
... >> narrator: obama arrived in chicago after the election of the city's first black mayor, harold washington. >> ...have joined hands to form a new democratic coalition... (applause and cheers) >> i think that the fact that chicago had elected an african-american mayor in harold washington sort of emphasized with barack that he was coming to a city where blacks were a major presence and had some significance. >> narrator: washington's politics were a living example of what obama was looking for. >> what washington was able to do was to put together these coalitions-- african-americans, latinos and progressive whites. and he was able to pull that together and beat the machine. >> god bless you all and thank you from the bottom of my heart. >> and that kind of coalition building was incredibly influential for barack. >> narrator: obama's laboratory would be the city's south side. >> we had put an ad in a number of newspapers for a community organizer in the south side of chicago. i'm okinfor anybody who might be a good organizer, but i particularly need somebody who's african-american. >> and
to send a message to washington: stop spending money we don't have. how can we afford this tax? ...big corporations and the richest two percent. >> what's at stake is the future of america. >> it costs us, and taxes us, too much. >> american future fund is responsible for the content of this advertising. >> ryssdal: i knew right away this wasn't going to be the usual story on campaign finance. one of the first surprises was finding myself driving the dark streets of denver with attorney alan schwartz, who shared kind of a strange experience. >> it was early january of 2011, and my wife, who had just been reelected to the colorado state senate, got an e-mail from someone who claimed to have some information about a group that had sent out some attack ads against my wife. >> ryssdal: the guy said he had some documents, and a week later... >> i heard from this individual again. still not identifying himself, but telling me that if i wanted to see the documents, then i needed to get them that day. >> ryssdal: had to be that day. >> had to be that day. >> ryssdal: schwartz agreed to meet th
polarizing issues in america. two states-- oregon and washington-- have legalized doctor-assisted suicide, and only for the terminally ill. but around the country, people who want help dying aren't waiting for the laws to change. instead, they've gone underground. this is a journey told from the inside, far from public view. this is the hidden world of assisted suicide. >> i'm not afraid of dying. i've always believed that death is nothing to fear. it's part of living. everybody has to do it. and i want to make sure that my death is going to be my way. >> narrator: if joan foley butterstein lived in oregon or washington, an open conversation with a doctor could allow her to end her life the way she's always lived it, on her own terms. by age 18, joan had set out on her own. she was a singer and a dancer at the latin quarter in new york city. she married tom foley, her high school sweetheart, and began her life as a marine wife. nine years later, their daughter kathleen was born. life was good. but then, after 54 years of marriage, tom got sick. >> my husband died of lung cancer. and he we
uncertainties in climate science." today at the washington, d.c., headquarters of the competitive enterprise institute, a free market think tank, you can see myron ebell's philosophy proudly displayed on the walls. >> they're all cei authors... what we're fighting is the expansion of government. and there are many pretexts for expanding government. >> hockenberry: opsing government action on climate change to defend american freedom is a perfect fit. >> we felt that if you concede the science is settled and there is a consensus, you cannot... the moral high ground has been ceded to the alarmists. >> hockenberry: so you had to go to work and break down this consensu >> yes. and we did it because we believed that the consensus was phony. we believed that the so-called global warming consensus was not based on science but was a political consensus, which included a number of scientists. >> hockenberry: in 2009, agreement on global warming seemed part of the solid wave of enthusiasm that elected barack obama. with the changing of the guard in washington, there was a bipartisan call to action, a
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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